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Financial Corner: Know Your Risk Tolerance at Different Stages of Life

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As an investor, you’ll always need to deal with risk of some kind. But how can you manage the risk that’s been made clear by the recent volatility in the financial markets? The answer to this question may depend on where you are in life.

Let’s look at some different life stages and how you might deal with risk at each of them:

Young couple investmentWhen you’re first starting out … If you’re early in your career, with perhaps four or even five decades to go until you retire, you can likely afford to invest primarily for growth, which also means you’ll be taking on a higher level of risk, as risk and reward are positively correlated. But, given your age, you have time to overcome the market downturns that are both inevitable and a normal part of investing. Consequently, your risk tolerance may be relatively high. Still, even at this stage, being over-aggressive can be costly.


When you’re in the middle stages … At this time of your life, you’re well along in your career, and you’re probably working on at least a couple of financial goals, such as saving for retirement and possibly for your children’s college education. So, you still need to be investing for growth, which means you’ll likely need to maintain a relatively high risk tolerance. Nonetheless, it’s a good idea to have some balance in your portfolio, so you’ll want to consider a mix of investments that align with each of your goals.


middle age investmentWhen you’re a few years from retirement … Now, you might have already achieved some key goals – perhaps your kids have finished college and you’ve paid off your mortgage. This may mean you have more money available to put away for retirement, but you’ll still have to think carefully about how much risk you’re willing to take. Since you’re going to retire soon, you might consider rebalancing your portfolio to include some more conservative investments, whose value is less susceptible to financial market fluctuations.

The reason? In just a few years, when you’re retired, you will need to start taking withdrawals from your investment portfolio – essentially, you’ll be selling investments, so, as much as possible, you’ll want to avoid selling them when their price is down. Nonetheless, having a balanced and diversified portfolio doesn’t fully protect against a loss. However, you can further reduce the future risk of being overly dependent on selling variable investments by devoting a certain percentage of your portfolio to cash and cash equivalents and designating this portion to be used for your daily expenses during the years immediately preceding, and possibly spilling into, your retirement.


retirement age investmentWhen you’re retired … Once you’re retired, you might think you should take no risks at all. But you could spend two or three decades in retirement, so you may need some growth potential in your portfolio to stay ahead of inflation. Establishing a withdrawal rate – the amount you take out each year from your investments – that’s appropriate for your lifestyle and projected longevity can reduce the risk of outliving your money. Of course, if there’s an extended market downturn during any time of your retirement, you may want to lower your withdrawal rate temporarily.


As you can see, your tolerance for risk, and your methods of dealing with it, can change over time. By being aware of this progression, you can make better-informed investment decisions.

Review John-Paul’s Financial Corner Articles:


“If anyone has any questions please reach out and use me as a resource. If anyone in this community wants to pick my brain or has concerns about what’s going on in the market, I’d would be happy to make myself available.”

Bio of Local Resident John-Paul:

John PaulHi, my name is John-Paul Tancona and I’m a financial advisor with Edward Jones. I have over 19 years of experience in this industry, working with both institutional and retail investors.

John PaulI earned my bachelor’s degree at Villanova University in 2000 and immediately started my years journey into the world of finance. My first 13 years were spent working at high profile wealth management firms covering large institutional investors. Recently, I joined Edward Jones and changed my focus to educating and empowering individual investors so they can achieve all of their financial goals.

We believe in working with investors one on one, either at your local Edward Jones office or conveniently at your kitchen table. We want to find out what is most important to you and your family so we can take you through our established process and partner together for life.

Whether you’re planning for retirement, saving for your children or grandchildren’s college education or just trying to protect the financial future of the ones you care for the most, we can work together to develop personalized solutions tailored specifically to help you achieve your goals.

I live in Sparta with my wife, Julieann, and two children: Dominic (10) and Daniel (7).

My branch office administrator, Ellen Hawkins, has 35 years of experience and is dedicated to offering you an ideal client experience.

I look forward to answering your financial questions and concerns. Please contact me to discuss your options so you can make informed decisions about your unique financial situation.   

 

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